mic's blog

What DAW should I get?

Submitted by mic on Wed, 05/23/2018 - 21:50

I can list what I want in a DAW. I have thought about this.

It is not like developers are just waiting for my opinion, but this could be interesting. Popular recording software keeps expanding, adding new functionality, each piece more obscure than the other. Is all of it necessary? Can my list be shorter than the laundry list of everything?

Here is a list of DAW features. It is short.

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MIDI to wave synthesizers

Submitted by mic on Fri, 03/30/2018 - 11:22

I thought designing a MIDI-to-wave synthesizer would be difficult. I wanted to be able to convert a MIDI file to a wave file without having to play the file and record the playback. As it turns out, a synthesizer can be very simple. I put one together – perhaps not a great one, but a good enough one.

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Mixing then and now

Submitted by mic on Fri, 03/30/2018 - 11:18

It occurred to me that the way I mix songs now is different than the way I mixed songs before. I cannot say I have gotten better. It is likely that my taste has changed a bit – tastes always evolve. The differences in my approach seem minor, but the differences in the result sounds significant.

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Orinj version 3.0.0 beta

Submitted by mic on Fri, 03/30/2018 - 10:57

Orinj is our software for recording and mixing, with multitrack sessions, wave and MIDI editing, drum loop creation, DSP effects, and so on, and so on. We have now released the beta 3.0.0 version of Orinj. It is available for free download, with some minor limitations as described below.

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Searching for the old tritone

Submitted by mic on Fri, 03/30/2018 - 10:55

Five years ago, I wrote a post on the excommunication of the tritone by the catholic church. The tritone is an interval of six semitones (or three tones). The church excommunicated the tritone a long time ago. Presumably, they were hearing it as it used to sound then – with a tuning that was different than the tuning we use today. Today, we tune instruments so that the 12 notes on the chromatic scale split an octave evenly (i.e., the chromatic scale is equally tempered). In the past, tuning tried to get better use of harmonics (for example, the Pythogorean tuning).

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